1/72 Messerschmitt Bf109 B1

Item Name 1/72 Messerschmitt Bf109 B1
Price $4.95
Description The Messerschmitt Bf 109, was a German World War II fighter aircraft that was the backbone of the Luftwaffe's fighter force. The Bf 109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War (1939) and was still in service at the dawn of the jet age at the end of World War II (1945). It was one of the most advanced fighters of the era, including such features as all-metal monocoque construction, a closed canopy, and retractable landing gear. It was powered by a liquid-cooled, inverted-V12 aero engine. From the end of 1941, the Bf 109 was steadily being supplemented by the superior Focke-Wulf Fw 190. It was commonly called the Me 109 most often by Allied aircrew and even amongst the German aces themselves even though this was not the official German designation. The "Bf 109" designation was issued by the German ministry of aviation and represents the developing company Bayerische Flugzeugwerke and is a rather arbitrary figure. It was designed by Willy Messerschmitt (hence Me 109) and Robert Lusser, who worked at Bayerische Flugzeugwerke, during the early to mid-1930s. Originally conceived as an interceptor, later models were developed to fulfill multiple tasks, serving as bomber escort, fighter-bomber, day-, night-, all-weather fighter, ground-attack aircraft, and as reconnaissance aircraft. It was supplied to and operated by several states during World War II, and served with several countries for many years after the war. The Bf 109 was the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 airframes produced from 1936 up to April 1945. The Bf 109 was flown by the three top-scoring German fighter aces of World War II, who claimed 928 victories among them while flying with Jagdgeschwader 52, mainly on the Eastern Front. The highest scoring fighter ace of all time, Erich Hartmann, flew the Bf 109 and was credited with 352 aerial victories. The aircraft was also flown by Hans-Joachim Marseille, the highest scoring German ace in the North African Campaign who achieved 158 aerial victories. It was also flown by several other aces from Germany's allies, notably Finn Ilmari Juutilainen, the highest scoring non-German ace on the type, and pilots from Italy, Romania, Croatia, Bulgaria and Hungary. Through constant development, the Bf 109 remained competitive with the latest Allied fighter aircraft until the end of the war. The first Bf 109 in serial production, the Bf 109 B-1, was fitted with the 670 PS (661 hp, 493 kW) Jumo 210D engine driving a two-bladed fixed-pitch propeller. During the production run a variable-pitch propeller was introduced and often retrofitted to older aircraft; these were then unofficially known as B-2s. The Bf 109B saw combat with the Legion Condor during the Spanish Civil War, although it was apparent that the armament was still inadequate. Several aircraft were produced with an engine-mounted machine gun but it was very unreliable, most likely because of engine vibrations and overheating. Thus the Bf 109 V8 was constructed to test the fitting of two more machine guns in the wings; however, results showed that the wing needed strengthening. In the following V9 prototype, both wing guns were replaced by 20 mm MG FF cannons. A total of 341 Bf 109 B-1s were built by Messerschmitt, Fieseler, and the Erla Maschinenwerke.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This is paper model of 4 Bf109 B1's color scheme, Bf 109B-1 du 2/J 88 Spain 1937 Flown by Sgt.Norbert Fiegel, Bf 109B-1 du 2/J 88 Spain 1937 Capture by Republican, Bf 109B-1 du 2/J 88 Spain 1938 Capture by Republican and Bf 109B-1 du 2/J 88 Spain 1938 in German Messerschmitt paint scheme.

Paper Model Details: 28 parts on 1 page including opaque canopy, stack landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and a page with detail instruction diagram.

Pictures
Item Name 1/72 Messerschmitt Bf109 B1
Price $4.95
Description The Messerschmitt Bf 109, was a German World War II fighter aircraft that was the backbone of the Luftwaffe's fighter force. The Bf 109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War (1939) and was still in service at the dawn of the jet age at the end of World War II (1945). It was one of the most advanced fighters of the era, including such features as all-metal monocoque construction, a closed canopy, and retractable landing gear. It was powered by a liquid-cooled, inverted-V12 aero engine. From the end of 1941, the Bf 109 was steadily being supplemented by the superior Focke-Wulf Fw 190. It was commonly called the Me 109 most often by Allied aircrew and even amongst the German aces themselves even though this was not the official German designation. The "Bf 109" designation was issued by the German ministry of aviation and represents the developing company Bayerische Flugzeugwerke and is a rather arbitrary figure. It was designed by Willy Messerschmitt (hence Me 109) and Robert Lusser, who worked at Bayerische Flugzeugwerke, during the early to mid-1930s. Originally conceived as an interceptor, later models were developed to fulfill multiple tasks, serving as bomber escort, fighter-bomber, day-, night-, all-weather fighter, ground-attack aircraft, and as reconnaissance aircraft. It was supplied to and operated by several states during World War II, and served with several countries for many years after the war. The Bf 109 was the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 airframes produced from 1936 up to April 1945. The Bf 109 was flown by the three top-scoring German fighter aces of World War II, who claimed 928 victories among them while flying with Jagdgeschwader 52, mainly on the Eastern Front. The highest scoring fighter ace of all time, Erich Hartmann, flew the Bf 109 and was credited with 352 aerial victories. The aircraft was also flown by Hans-Joachim Marseille, the highest scoring German ace in the North African Campaign who achieved 158 aerial victories. It was also flown by several other aces from Germany's allies, notably Finn Ilmari Juutilainen, the highest scoring non-German ace on the type, and pilots from Italy, Romania, Croatia, Bulgaria and Hungary. Through constant development, the Bf 109 remained competitive with the latest Allied fighter aircraft until the end of the war. The first Bf 109 in serial production, the Bf 109 B-1, was fitted with the 670 PS (661 hp, 493 kW) Jumo 210D engine driving a two-bladed fixed-pitch propeller. During the production run a variable-pitch propeller was introduced and often retrofitted to older aircraft; these were then unofficially known as B-2s. The Bf 109B saw combat with the Legion Condor during the Spanish Civil War, although it was apparent that the armament was still inadequate. Several aircraft were produced with an engine-mounted machine gun but it was very unreliable, most likely because of engine vibrations and overheating. Thus the Bf 109 V8 was constructed to test the fitting of two more machine guns in the wings; however, results showed that the wing needed strengthening. In the following V9 prototype, both wing guns were replaced by 20 mm MG FF cannons. A total of 341 Bf 109 B-1s were built by Messerschmitt, Fieseler, and the Erla Maschinenwerke.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This is paper model of 4 Bf109 B1's color scheme, Bf 109B-1 du 2/J 88 Spain 1937 Flown by Sgt.Norbert Fiegel, Bf 109B-1 du 2/J 88 Spain 1937 Capture by Republican, Bf 109B-1 du 2/J 88 Spain 1938 Capture by Republican and Bf 109B-1 du 2/J 88 Spain 1938 in German Messerschmitt paint scheme.

Paper Model Details: 28 parts on 1 page including opaque canopy, stack landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and a page with detail instruction diagram.

Pictures

1/48 Lockheed F-94C Starfire

Item Name 1/48 Lockheed F-94C Starfire
Price $4.95
Description The Lockheed F-94 Starfire was a first-generation jet aircraft of the United States Air Force. It was developed from the twin-seat Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star in the late 1940s as an all-weather, day/night interceptor. The aircraft reached operational service in May 1950 with Air Defense Command, replacing the piston-engined North American F-82 Twin Mustang in the all-weather interceptor role. The F-94 was the first operational USAF fighter equipped with an afterburner and was the first jet-powered all-weather fighter to enter combat during the Korean War in January 1953. It had a relatively brief operational life, being replaced in the mid-1950s by the Northrop F-89 Scorpion and North American F-86D Sabre interceptor aircraft. The last aircraft left active-duty service in 1958 and Air National Guard service in 1959.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This is paper model of Lockheed F-94C Starfire in USAF No.01054 marking

Paper Model Details: 90 parts on 4 page including opaque canopy, stack landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and 3 pages with detail instruction diagram.

Pictures

Item Name 1/48 Lockheed F-94C Starfire
Price $4.95
Description The Lockheed F-94 Starfire was a first-generation jet aircraft of the United States Air Force. It was developed from the twin-seat Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star in the late 1940s as an all-weather, day/night interceptor. The aircraft reached operational service in May 1950 with Air Defense Command, replacing the piston-engined North American F-82 Twin Mustang in the all-weather interceptor role. The F-94 was the first operational USAF fighter equipped with an afterburner and was the first jet-powered all-weather fighter to enter combat during the Korean War in January 1953. It had a relatively brief operational life, being replaced in the mid-1950s by the Northrop F-89 Scorpion and North American F-86D Sabre interceptor aircraft. The last aircraft left active-duty service in 1958 and Air National Guard service in 1959.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This is paper model of Lockheed F-94C Starfire in USAF No.01054 marking

Paper Model Details: 90 parts on 4 page including opaque canopy, stack landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and 3 pages with detail instruction diagram.

Pictures

1/72 Messerschmitt Bf109 B in 4 different scheme

Item Name 1/72 Messerschmitt Bf109 B
Price $4.95
Description The Messerschmitt Bf 109, was a German World War II fighter aircraft that was the backbone of the Luftwaffe's fighter force. The Bf 109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War (1939) and was still in service at the dawn of the jet age at the end of World War II (1945). It was one of the most advanced fighters of the era, including such features as all-metal monocoque construction, a closed canopy, and retractable landing gear. It was powered by a liquid-cooled, inverted-V12 aero engine. From the end of 1941, the Bf 109 was steadily being supplemented by the superior Focke-Wulf Fw 190. It was commonly called the Me 109 most often by Allied aircrew and even amongst the German aces themselves even though this was not the official German designation. The "Bf 109" designation was issued by the German ministry of aviation and represents the developing company Bayerische Flugzeugwerke and is a rather arbitrary figure. It was designed by Willy Messerschmitt (hence Me 109) and Robert Lusser, who worked at Bayerische Flugzeugwerke, during the early to mid-1930s. Originally conceived as an interceptor, later models were developed to fulfill multiple tasks, serving as bomber escort, fighter-bomber, day-, night-, all-weather fighter, ground-attack aircraft, and as reconnaissance aircraft. It was supplied to and operated by several states during World War II, and served with several countries for many years after the war. The Bf 109 was the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 airframes produced from 1936 up to April 1945. The Bf 109 was flown by the three top-scoring German fighter aces of World War II, who claimed 928 victories among them while flying with Jagdgeschwader 52, mainly on the Eastern Front. The highest scoring fighter ace of all time, Erich Hartmann, flew the Bf 109 and was credited with 352 aerial victories. The aircraft was also flown by Hans-Joachim Marseille, the highest scoring German ace in the North African Campaign who achieved 158 aerial victories. It was also flown by several other aces from Germany's allies, notably Finn Ilmari Juutilainen, the highest scoring non-German ace on the type, and pilots from Italy, Romania, Croatia, Bulgaria and Hungary. Through constant development, the Bf 109 remained competitive with the latest Allied fighter aircraft until the end of the war. The first Bf 109 in serial production, the Bf 109 B-1, was fitted with the 670 PS (661 hp, 493 kW) Jumo 210D engine driving a two-bladed fixed-pitch propeller. During the production run a variable-pitch propeller was introduced and often retrofitted to older aircraft; these were then unofficially known as B-2s. The Bf 109B saw combat with the Legion Condor during the Spanish Civil War, although it was apparent that the armament was still inadequate. Several aircraft were produced with an engine-mounted machine gun but it was very unreliable, most likely because of engine vibrations and overheating. Thus the Bf 109 V8 was constructed to test the fitting of two more machine guns in the wings; however, results showed that the wing needed strengthening. In the following V9 prototype, both wing guns were replaced by 20 mm MG FF cannons. A total of 341 Bf 109 B-1s were built by Messerschmitt, Fieseler, and the Erla Maschinenwerke.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This is paper model of 4 Bf109 B's color scheme, Bf 109B-1 du 2/J 88 Spain 1938, Bf 109B-2 du 2/ JG 132 Richthofen 1937, Bf 109B-2 du 2/ J 88 Spain 1937 and Bf 109B Oblt. Hannes Trautloft 1937.

Paper Model Details: 28 parts on 1 page including opaque canopy, stack landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and a page with detail instruction diagram.

Pictures

Item Name 1/72 Messerschmitt Bf109 B
Price $4.95
Description The Messerschmitt Bf 109, was a German World War II fighter aircraft that was the backbone of the Luftwaffe's fighter force. The Bf 109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War (1939) and was still in service at the dawn of the jet age at the end of World War II (1945). It was one of the most advanced fighters of the era, including such features as all-metal monocoque construction, a closed canopy, and retractable landing gear. It was powered by a liquid-cooled, inverted-V12 aero engine. From the end of 1941, the Bf 109 was steadily being supplemented by the superior Focke-Wulf Fw 190. It was commonly called the Me 109 most often by Allied aircrew and even amongst the German aces themselves even though this was not the official German designation. The "Bf 109" designation was issued by the German ministry of aviation and represents the developing company Bayerische Flugzeugwerke and is a rather arbitrary figure. It was designed by Willy Messerschmitt (hence Me 109) and Robert Lusser, who worked at Bayerische Flugzeugwerke, during the early to mid-1930s. Originally conceived as an interceptor, later models were developed to fulfill multiple tasks, serving as bomber escort, fighter-bomber, day-, night-, all-weather fighter, ground-attack aircraft, and as reconnaissance aircraft. It was supplied to and operated by several states during World War II, and served with several countries for many years after the war. The Bf 109 was the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 airframes produced from 1936 up to April 1945. The Bf 109 was flown by the three top-scoring German fighter aces of World War II, who claimed 928 victories among them while flying with Jagdgeschwader 52, mainly on the Eastern Front. The highest scoring fighter ace of all time, Erich Hartmann, flew the Bf 109 and was credited with 352 aerial victories. The aircraft was also flown by Hans-Joachim Marseille, the highest scoring German ace in the North African Campaign who achieved 158 aerial victories. It was also flown by several other aces from Germany's allies, notably Finn Ilmari Juutilainen, the highest scoring non-German ace on the type, and pilots from Italy, Romania, Croatia, Bulgaria and Hungary. Through constant development, the Bf 109 remained competitive with the latest Allied fighter aircraft until the end of the war. The first Bf 109 in serial production, the Bf 109 B-1, was fitted with the 670 PS (661 hp, 493 kW) Jumo 210D engine driving a two-bladed fixed-pitch propeller. During the production run a variable-pitch propeller was introduced and often retrofitted to older aircraft; these were then unofficially known as B-2s. The Bf 109B saw combat with the Legion Condor during the Spanish Civil War, although it was apparent that the armament was still inadequate. Several aircraft were produced with an engine-mounted machine gun but it was very unreliable, most likely because of engine vibrations and overheating. Thus the Bf 109 V8 was constructed to test the fitting of two more machine guns in the wings; however, results showed that the wing needed strengthening. In the following V9 prototype, both wing guns were replaced by 20 mm MG FF cannons. A total of 341 Bf 109 B-1s were built by Messerschmitt, Fieseler, and the Erla Maschinenwerke.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This is paper model of 4 Bf109 B's color scheme, Bf 109B-1 du 2/J 88 Spain 1938, Bf 109B-2 du 2/ JG 132 Richthofen 1937, Bf 109B-2 du 2/ J 88 Spain 1937 and Bf 109B Oblt. Hannes Trautloft 1937.

Paper Model Details: 28 parts on 1 page including opaque canopy, stack landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and a page with detail instruction diagram.

Pictures

1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - HQ Chutai, 29th Sentai

Item Name 1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - HQ Chutai, 29th Sentai
Price $10.95
Description The Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate (キ84 疾風"Gale") was a single-seat fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service in World War II. The Allied reporting name was "Frank"; the Japanese Army designation was Army Type 4 Fighter (四式戦闘機 yon-shiki-sentō-ki). Featuring excellent performance and high maneuverability, the Ki-84 was considered to be the best Japanese fighter to see large scale operations during World War II. It was able to match any Allied fighter, and to intercept the high-flying B-29 Superfortresses. Its powerful armament (that could include two 30 mm and two 20 mm cannon) increased its lethality. Though hampered by poor production quality in later models, a high-maintenance engine, landing gear prone to buckle, inconsistent fuel quality, and a lack of experienced pilots above all else, Hayates proved to be fearsome opponents; a total of 3,514 were built. The Ki-84 was the fastest fighter in the Imperial Japanese military if good fuel was used and the aircraft was in good shape.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate in HQ Chutai, 29th Sentai in the summer of 1945.

Paper Model Details: 144 parts on 8 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and 7 pages with detail instruction diagram.
Pictures





Item Name 1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - HQ Chutai, 29th Sentai
Price $10.95
Description The Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate (キ84 疾風"Gale") was a single-seat fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service in World War II. The Allied reporting name was "Frank"; the Japanese Army designation was Army Type 4 Fighter (四式戦闘機 yon-shiki-sentō-ki). Featuring excellent performance and high maneuverability, the Ki-84 was considered to be the best Japanese fighter to see large scale operations during World War II. It was able to match any Allied fighter, and to intercept the high-flying B-29 Superfortresses. Its powerful armament (that could include two 30 mm and two 20 mm cannon) increased its lethality. Though hampered by poor production quality in later models, a high-maintenance engine, landing gear prone to buckle, inconsistent fuel quality, and a lack of experienced pilots above all else, Hayates proved to be fearsome opponents; a total of 3,514 were built. The Ki-84 was the fastest fighter in the Imperial Japanese military if good fuel was used and the aircraft was in good shape.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate in HQ Chutai, 29th Sentai in the summer of 1945.

Paper Model Details: 144 parts on 8 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and 7 pages with detail instruction diagram.
Pictures





1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - 22nd Fighter Group

Item Name 1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - 22nd Fighter Group Hankow China
Price $10.95
Description The Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate (キ84 疾風"Gale") was a single-seat fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service in World War II. The Allied reporting name was "Frank"; the Japanese Army designation was Army Type 4 Fighter (四式戦闘機 yon-shiki-sentō-ki). Featuring excellent performance and high maneuverability, the Ki-84 was considered to be the best Japanese fighter to see large scale operations during World War II. It was able to match any Allied fighter, and to intercept the high-flying B-29 Superfortresses. Its powerful armament (that could include two 30 mm and two 20 mm cannon) increased its lethality. Though hampered by poor production quality in later models, a high-maintenance engine, landing gear prone to buckle, inconsistent fuel quality, and a lack of experienced pilots above all else, Hayates proved to be fearsome opponents; a total of 3,514 were built. The Ki-84 was the fastest fighter in the Imperial Japanese military if good fuel was used and the aircraft was in good shape.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate in 22nd Fighter Group Hankow China.

Paper Model Details: 144 parts on 8 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and 7 pages with detail instruction diagram.
Pictures





Item Name 1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - 22nd Fighter Group Hankow China
Price $10.95
Description The Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate (キ84 疾風"Gale") was a single-seat fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service in World War II. The Allied reporting name was "Frank"; the Japanese Army designation was Army Type 4 Fighter (四式戦闘機 yon-shiki-sentō-ki). Featuring excellent performance and high maneuverability, the Ki-84 was considered to be the best Japanese fighter to see large scale operations during World War II. It was able to match any Allied fighter, and to intercept the high-flying B-29 Superfortresses. Its powerful armament (that could include two 30 mm and two 20 mm cannon) increased its lethality. Though hampered by poor production quality in later models, a high-maintenance engine, landing gear prone to buckle, inconsistent fuel quality, and a lack of experienced pilots above all else, Hayates proved to be fearsome opponents; a total of 3,514 were built. The Ki-84 was the fastest fighter in the Imperial Japanese military if good fuel was used and the aircraft was in good shape.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate in 22nd Fighter Group Hankow China.

Paper Model Details: 144 parts on 8 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and 7 pages with detail instruction diagram.
Pictures





1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - 102nd Group Okinawa

Item Name 1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - 102nd Group Okinawa
Price $10.95
Description The Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate (キ84 疾風"Gale") was a single-seat fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service in World War II. The Allied reporting name was "Frank"; the Japanese Army designation was Army Type 4 Fighter (四式戦闘機 yon-shiki-sentō-ki). Featuring excellent performance and high maneuverability, the Ki-84 was considered to be the best Japanese fighter to see large scale operations during World War II. It was able to match any Allied fighter, and to intercept the high-flying B-29 Superfortresses. Its powerful armament (that could include two 30 mm and two 20 mm cannon) increased its lethality. Though hampered by poor production quality in later models, a high-maintenance engine, landing gear prone to buckle, inconsistent fuel quality, and a lack of experienced pilots above all else, Hayates proved to be fearsome opponents; a total of 3,514 were built. The Ki-84 was the fastest fighter in the Imperial Japanese military if good fuel was used and the aircraft was in good shape.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate in 102nd Group Okinawa.

Paper Model Details: 144 parts on 8 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and 7 pages with detail instruction diagram.
Pictures





Item Name 1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - 102nd Group Okinawa
Price $10.95
Description The Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate (キ84 疾風"Gale") was a single-seat fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service in World War II. The Allied reporting name was "Frank"; the Japanese Army designation was Army Type 4 Fighter (四式戦闘機 yon-shiki-sentō-ki). Featuring excellent performance and high maneuverability, the Ki-84 was considered to be the best Japanese fighter to see large scale operations during World War II. It was able to match any Allied fighter, and to intercept the high-flying B-29 Superfortresses. Its powerful armament (that could include two 30 mm and two 20 mm cannon) increased its lethality. Though hampered by poor production quality in later models, a high-maintenance engine, landing gear prone to buckle, inconsistent fuel quality, and a lack of experienced pilots above all else, Hayates proved to be fearsome opponents; a total of 3,514 were built. The Ki-84 was the fastest fighter in the Imperial Japanese military if good fuel was used and the aircraft was in good shape.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate in 102nd Group Okinawa.

Paper Model Details: 144 parts on 8 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and 7 pages with detail instruction diagram.
Pictures





1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - 51st Flight Regiment

Item Name 1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - 51st Flight Regiment
Price $10.95
Description The Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate (キ84 疾風"Gale") was a single-seat fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service in World War II. The Allied reporting name was "Frank"; the Japanese Army designation was Army Type 4 Fighter (四式戦闘機 yon-shiki-sentō-ki). Featuring excellent performance and high maneuverability, the Ki-84 was considered to be the best Japanese fighter to see large scale operations during World War II. It was able to match any Allied fighter, and to intercept the high-flying B-29 Superfortresses. Its powerful armament (that could include two 30 mm and two 20 mm cannon) increased its lethality. Though hampered by poor production quality in later models, a high-maintenance engine, landing gear prone to buckle, inconsistent fuel quality, and a lack of experienced pilots above all else, Hayates proved to be fearsome opponents; a total of 3,514 were built. The Ki-84 was the fastest fighter in the Imperial Japanese military if good fuel was used and the aircraft was in good shape.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate in 51st Flight Regiment .

Paper Model Details: 144 parts on 8 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and 7 pages with detail instruction diagram.
Pictures





Item Name 1/32 Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate - 51st Flight Regiment
Price $10.95
Description The Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate (キ84 疾風"Gale") was a single-seat fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service in World War II. The Allied reporting name was "Frank"; the Japanese Army designation was Army Type 4 Fighter (四式戦闘機 yon-shiki-sentō-ki). Featuring excellent performance and high maneuverability, the Ki-84 was considered to be the best Japanese fighter to see large scale operations during World War II. It was able to match any Allied fighter, and to intercept the high-flying B-29 Superfortresses. Its powerful armament (that could include two 30 mm and two 20 mm cannon) increased its lethality. Though hampered by poor production quality in later models, a high-maintenance engine, landing gear prone to buckle, inconsistent fuel quality, and a lack of experienced pilots above all else, Hayates proved to be fearsome opponents; a total of 3,514 were built. The Ki-84 was the fastest fighter in the Imperial Japanese military if good fuel was used and the aircraft was in good shape.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate in 51st Flight Regiment .

Paper Model Details: 144 parts on 8 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels and 7 pages with detail instruction diagram.
Pictures





1/48 Kawasaki Ki-100-I Otsu - 5th Fighter Squadron

Item Name 1/48 Kawasaki Ki-100-I Otsu - 5th Fighter Squadron
Price $4.95
Description The Kawasaki Ki-100 was a fighter aircraft used by the Imperial Japanese Army in World War II. The Japanese Army designation was "Type 5 Fighter". No new Allied code name was assigned to this type; 275 Ki-100 airframes were built as Ki-61's before being modified to accept a radial engine in place of the original inline engine.

The emergency measure of adapting a Ki-61-II-KAI fighter to carry a Mitsubishi radial engine resulted in one of the best interceptors used by the Army during the entire war. It combined excellent power and maneuverability and, although its high-altitude performance against the USAAF Boeing B-29 Superfortress heavy bombers was limited by the lack of an efficient supercharger, it performed better than most other IJAAF fighters.

Operational missions began in March 1945. From the first engagements, the Ki-100 performed well against the B-29 and showed itself to be equally effective against U.S. Navy carrier fighters. A new variant, the Ki-100-Ib, was produced during the last weeks of the war in time to equip five sentai for home defense duties.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Ki-100 of 5th Fighter Squadron.

Paper Model Details: 91 parts on 3 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels, and alternative nose parts for simple build version of the nose.
Pictures

Item Name 1/48 Kawasaki Ki-100-I Otsu - 5th Fighter Squadron
Price $4.95
Description The Kawasaki Ki-100 was a fighter aircraft used by the Imperial Japanese Army in World War II. The Japanese Army designation was "Type 5 Fighter". No new Allied code name was assigned to this type; 275 Ki-100 airframes were built as Ki-61's before being modified to accept a radial engine in place of the original inline engine.

The emergency measure of adapting a Ki-61-II-KAI fighter to carry a Mitsubishi radial engine resulted in one of the best interceptors used by the Army during the entire war. It combined excellent power and maneuverability and, although its high-altitude performance against the USAAF Boeing B-29 Superfortress heavy bombers was limited by the lack of an efficient supercharger, it performed better than most other IJAAF fighters.

Operational missions began in March 1945. From the first engagements, the Ki-100 performed well against the B-29 and showed itself to be equally effective against U.S. Navy carrier fighters. A new variant, the Ki-100-Ib, was produced during the last weeks of the war in time to equip five sentai for home defense duties.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Ki-100 of 5th Fighter Squadron.

Paper Model Details: 91 parts on 3 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels, and alternative nose parts for simple build version of the nose.
Pictures

1/48 Hawker Typhoon Mk IB - Captured T9-GK

Item Name 1/48 Hawker Typhoon Mk IB - Captured T9-GK
Price $4.95
Description The Hawker Typhoon (Tiffy in RAF slang), was a British single-seat fighter-bomber, produced by Hawker Aircraft. It was intended to be a medium–high altitude interceptor, as a replacement for the Hawker Hurricane but several design problems were encountered and it never completely satisfied this requirement.

The Typhoon was originally designed to mount twelve .303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns and be powered by the latest 2000 hp engines. Its service introduction in mid-1941 was plagued with problems and for several months the aircraft faced a doubtful future. When the Luftwaffe brought the formidable Focke-Wulf Fw 190 into service in 1941, the Typhoon was the only RAF fighter capable of catching it at low altitudes; as a result it secured a new role as a low-altitude interceptor.

Through the support of pilots such as Roland Beamont it became established in roles such as night-time intruder and long-range fighter.[5] From late 1942 the Typhoon was equipped with bombs and from late 1943 RP-3 ground attack rockets were added to its armoury. With those weapons and its four 20mm Hispano cannon, the Typhoon became one of the Second World War's most successful ground-attack aircraft.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Hawker Typhoon Mk IB in livery Captured T9-GK.

Paper Model Details: 119 parts on five pages with three pages containing six instructional diagrams. Parts include opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, and stacked wheels.
Pictures

Item Name 1/48 Hawker Typhoon Mk IB - Captured T9-GK
Price $4.95
Description The Hawker Typhoon (Tiffy in RAF slang), was a British single-seat fighter-bomber, produced by Hawker Aircraft. It was intended to be a medium–high altitude interceptor, as a replacement for the Hawker Hurricane but several design problems were encountered and it never completely satisfied this requirement.

The Typhoon was originally designed to mount twelve .303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns and be powered by the latest 2000 hp engines. Its service introduction in mid-1941 was plagued with problems and for several months the aircraft faced a doubtful future. When the Luftwaffe brought the formidable Focke-Wulf Fw 190 into service in 1941, the Typhoon was the only RAF fighter capable of catching it at low altitudes; as a result it secured a new role as a low-altitude interceptor.

Through the support of pilots such as Roland Beamont it became established in roles such as night-time intruder and long-range fighter.[5] From late 1942 the Typhoon was equipped with bombs and from late 1943 RP-3 ground attack rockets were added to its armoury. With those weapons and its four 20mm Hispano cannon, the Typhoon became one of the Second World War's most successful ground-attack aircraft.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Hawker Typhoon Mk IB in livery Captured T9-GK.

Paper Model Details: 119 parts on five pages with three pages containing six instructional diagrams. Parts include opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, and stacked wheels.
Pictures

1/100 Douglas TBD Devastator

Item Name 1/100 Douglas TBD Devastator
Price $0.00
Description The Douglas TBD Devastator was a torpedo bomber of the United States Navy, ordered in 1934, it first flew in 1935 and entered service in 1937. At that point, it was the most advanced aircraft flying for the USN and possibly for any navy in the world. However, the fast pace of aircraft development quickly caught up with it, and by the time of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor the TBD was already outdated.


The Devastator performed well in some early battles, but earned notoriety for its catastrophically poor performance in the Battle of Midway, in which the 41 Devastators launched during the battle produced zero successful torpedo hits and only 6 survived to return to their carriers. Vastly outclassed in both speed and maneuverability by the Mitsubishi Zero fighters they faced, the vast majority of the force was wiped out with little consequence except to distract the Zeros from the much more capable (and survivable) SBD Dauntlessdive bombers that eventually sank 4 Japanese carriers and a heavy cruiser. Although a small portion of the Devastator's dismal performance was later attributed to the many well-documented defects in the US Mark 13 torpedo, the aircraft was immediately withdrawn from frontline service after Midway, being replaced by theGrumman TBF Avenger.


Model is available in letter format with detail instruction diagram
Pictures
Item Name 1/100 Douglas TBD Devastator
Price $0.00
Description The Douglas TBD Devastator was a torpedo bomber of the United States Navy, ordered in 1934, it first flew in 1935 and entered service in 1937. At that point, it was the most advanced aircraft flying for the USN and possibly for any navy in the world. However, the fast pace of aircraft development quickly caught up with it, and by the time of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor the TBD was already outdated.


The Devastator performed well in some early battles, but earned notoriety for its catastrophically poor performance in the Battle of Midway, in which the 41 Devastators launched during the battle produced zero successful torpedo hits and only 6 survived to return to their carriers. Vastly outclassed in both speed and maneuverability by the Mitsubishi Zero fighters they faced, the vast majority of the force was wiped out with little consequence except to distract the Zeros from the much more capable (and survivable) SBD Dauntlessdive bombers that eventually sank 4 Japanese carriers and a heavy cruiser. Although a small portion of the Devastator's dismal performance was later attributed to the many well-documented defects in the US Mark 13 torpedo, the aircraft was immediately withdrawn from frontline service after Midway, being replaced by theGrumman TBF Avenger.


Model is available in letter format with detail instruction diagram
Pictures

1/100 Hawker Hurricane Mk.II

Item Name 1/100 Hawker Hurricane Mk.II
Price $0.00
Description The Hawker Hurricane is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd for the Royal Air Force (RAF). Although largely overshadowed by the Supermarine Spitfire, the aircraft became renowned during the Battle of Britain, accounting for 60% of the RAF's air victories in the battle, and served in all the major theatres of the Second World War.

The 1930s design evolved through several versions and adaptations, resulting in a series of aircraft which acted as interceptor-fighters, fighter-bombers (also called "Hurribombers"), and ground support aircraft. Further versions known as the Sea Hurricane had modifications which enabled operation from ships. Some were converted as catapult-launched convoy escorts, known as "Hurricats". More than 14,583 Hurricanes were built by the end of 1944 (including at least 800 converted to Sea Hurricanes[3] and some 1,400 built in Canada by Canadian Car and Foundry).

*** Information from Wikipedia


Model is available in letter format with detail instruction diagram
Pictures
Item Name 1/100 Hawker Hurricane Mk.II
Price $0.00
Description The Hawker Hurricane is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd for the Royal Air Force (RAF). Although largely overshadowed by the Supermarine Spitfire, the aircraft became renowned during the Battle of Britain, accounting for 60% of the RAF's air victories in the battle, and served in all the major theatres of the Second World War.

The 1930s design evolved through several versions and adaptations, resulting in a series of aircraft which acted as interceptor-fighters, fighter-bombers (also called "Hurribombers"), and ground support aircraft. Further versions known as the Sea Hurricane had modifications which enabled operation from ships. Some were converted as catapult-launched convoy escorts, known as "Hurricats". More than 14,583 Hurricanes were built by the end of 1944 (including at least 800 converted to Sea Hurricanes[3] and some 1,400 built in Canada by Canadian Car and Foundry).

*** Information from Wikipedia


Model is available in letter format with detail instruction diagram
Pictures

1/48 Hawker Typhoon Mk-1B - No 175 Sqdrn RAF

Item Name 1/48 Hawker Typhoon Mk-1B - No 175 Sqdrn RAF
Price $4.95
Description The Hawker Typhoon (Tiffy in RAF slang), was a British single-seat fighter-bomber, produced by Hawker Aircraft. It was intended to be a medium–high altitude interceptor, as a replacement for the Hawker Hurricane but several design problems were encountered and it never completely satisfied this requirement.

The Typhoon was originally designed to mount twelve .303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns and be powered by the latest 2000 hp engines. Its service introduction in mid-1941 was plagued with problems and for several months the aircraft faced a doubtful future. When the Luftwaffe brought the formidable Focke-Wulf Fw 190 into service in 1941, the Typhoon was the only RAF fighter capable of catching it at low altitudes; as a result it secured a new role as a low-altitude interceptor.

Through the support of pilots such as Roland Beamont it became established in roles such as night-time intruder and long-range fighter.[5] From late 1942 the Typhoon was equipped with bombs and from late 1943 RP-3 ground attack rockets were added to its armoury. With those weapons and its four 20mm Hispano cannon, the Typhoon became one of the Second World War's most successful ground-attack aircraft.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Hawker Typhoon No. 175 Squadron Royal Air Force Hawker Typhoon Mk.IB serial number EK139, HH-N.

Paper Model Details: 119 parts on five pages with three pages containing six instructional diagrams. Parts include opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, and stacked wheels.
Pictures

Item Name 1/48 Hawker Typhoon Mk-1B - No 175 Sqdrn RAF
Price $4.95
Description The Hawker Typhoon (Tiffy in RAF slang), was a British single-seat fighter-bomber, produced by Hawker Aircraft. It was intended to be a medium–high altitude interceptor, as a replacement for the Hawker Hurricane but several design problems were encountered and it never completely satisfied this requirement.

The Typhoon was originally designed to mount twelve .303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns and be powered by the latest 2000 hp engines. Its service introduction in mid-1941 was plagued with problems and for several months the aircraft faced a doubtful future. When the Luftwaffe brought the formidable Focke-Wulf Fw 190 into service in 1941, the Typhoon was the only RAF fighter capable of catching it at low altitudes; as a result it secured a new role as a low-altitude interceptor.

Through the support of pilots such as Roland Beamont it became established in roles such as night-time intruder and long-range fighter.[5] From late 1942 the Typhoon was equipped with bombs and from late 1943 RP-3 ground attack rockets were added to its armoury. With those weapons and its four 20mm Hispano cannon, the Typhoon became one of the Second World War's most successful ground-attack aircraft.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Hawker Typhoon No. 175 Squadron Royal Air Force Hawker Typhoon Mk.IB serial number EK139, HH-N.

Paper Model Details: 119 parts on five pages with three pages containing six instructional diagrams. Parts include opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, and stacked wheels.
Pictures

1/48 Kawasaki Ki-100 II - Akeno Flight Training Division

Item Name 1/48 Ki-100 II - Akeno Flight Training Division
Price $4.95
Description The Kawasaki Ki-100 was a fighter aircraft used by the Imperial Japanese Army in World War II. The Japanese Army designation was "Type 5 Fighter". No new Allied code name was assigned to this type; 275 Ki-100 airframes were built as Ki-61's before being modified to accept a radial engine in place of the original inline engine.

The emergency measure of adapting a Ki-61-II-KAI fighter to carry a Mitsubishi radial engine resulted in one of the best interceptors used by the Army during the entire war. It combined excellent power and maneuverability and, although its high-altitude performance against the USAAF Boeing B-29 Superfortress heavy bombers was limited by the lack of an efficient supercharger, it performed better than most other IJAAF fighters.

Operational missions began in March 1945. From the first engagements, the Ki-100 performed well against the B-29 and showed itself to be equally effective against U.S. Navy carrier fighters. A new variant, the Ki-100-Ib, was produced during the last weeks of the war in time to equip five sentai for home defense duties.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Ki-100 builds the aircraft assigned to Akeno Flight Training Division of the 111th Air Regiment.

Paper Model Details: 91 parts on 3 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels, and alternative nose parts for simple build version of the nose.
Pictures

Item Name 1/48 Ki-100 II - Akeno Flight Training Division
Price $4.95
Description The Kawasaki Ki-100 was a fighter aircraft used by the Imperial Japanese Army in World War II. The Japanese Army designation was "Type 5 Fighter". No new Allied code name was assigned to this type; 275 Ki-100 airframes were built as Ki-61's before being modified to accept a radial engine in place of the original inline engine.

The emergency measure of adapting a Ki-61-II-KAI fighter to carry a Mitsubishi radial engine resulted in one of the best interceptors used by the Army during the entire war. It combined excellent power and maneuverability and, although its high-altitude performance against the USAAF Boeing B-29 Superfortress heavy bombers was limited by the lack of an efficient supercharger, it performed better than most other IJAAF fighters.

Operational missions began in March 1945. From the first engagements, the Ki-100 performed well against the B-29 and showed itself to be equally effective against U.S. Navy carrier fighters. A new variant, the Ki-100-Ib, was produced during the last weeks of the war in time to equip five sentai for home defense duties.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Ki-100 builds the aircraft assigned to Akeno Flight Training Division of the 111th Air Regiment.

Paper Model Details: 91 parts on 3 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels, and alternative nose parts for simple build version of the nose.
Pictures

1/48 Kawasaki Ki-100 - 111st Flight Regiment

Item Name 1/48 Kawasaki Ki-100 - 111st Flight Regiment
Price $4.95
Description The Kawasaki Ki-100 was a fighter aircraft used by the Imperial Japanese Army in World War II. The Japanese Army designation was "Type 5 Fighter". No new Allied code name was assigned to this type; 275 Ki-100 airframes were built as Ki-61's before being modified to accept a radial engine in place of the original inline engine.

The emergency measure of adapting a Ki-61-II-KAI fighter to carry a Mitsubishi radial engine resulted in one of the best interceptors used by the Army during the entire war. It combined excellent power and maneuverability and, although its high-altitude performance against the USAAF Boeing B-29 Superfortress heavy bombers was limited by the lack of an efficient supercharger, it performed better than most other IJAAF fighters.

Operational missions began in March 1945. From the first engagements, the Ki-100 performed well against the B-29 and showed itself to be equally effective against U.S. Navy carrier fighters. A new variant, the Ki-100-Ib, was produced during the last weeks of the war in time to equip five sentai for home defense duties.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Ki-100 builds the No. 80 aircraft assigned to 5th Company of the 111th Flight Regiment based out of Akeno Airfield in July 1945.

Paper Model Details: 91 parts on 3 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels, and alternative nose parts for simple build version of the nose.
Pictures

Item Name 1/48 Kawasaki Ki-100 - 111st Flight Regiment
Price $4.95
Description The Kawasaki Ki-100 was a fighter aircraft used by the Imperial Japanese Army in World War II. The Japanese Army designation was "Type 5 Fighter". No new Allied code name was assigned to this type; 275 Ki-100 airframes were built as Ki-61's before being modified to accept a radial engine in place of the original inline engine.

The emergency measure of adapting a Ki-61-II-KAI fighter to carry a Mitsubishi radial engine resulted in one of the best interceptors used by the Army during the entire war. It combined excellent power and maneuverability and, although its high-altitude performance against the USAAF Boeing B-29 Superfortress heavy bombers was limited by the lack of an efficient supercharger, it performed better than most other IJAAF fighters.

Operational missions began in March 1945. From the first engagements, the Ki-100 performed well against the B-29 and showed itself to be equally effective against U.S. Navy carrier fighters. A new variant, the Ki-100-Ib, was produced during the last weeks of the war in time to equip five sentai for home defense duties.

*** Information from Wikipedia ***

This paper model of the Ki-100 builds the No. 80 aircraft assigned to 5th Company of the 111th Flight Regiment based out of Akeno Airfield in July 1945.

Paper Model Details: 91 parts on 3 pages including opaque canopy, rolled landing gear, joins strips, internal formers, stacked wheels, and alternative nose parts for simple build version of the nose.
Pictures

1/100 Grumman F6F-5 Leichardt No 8

Item Name 1/100 Grumman F6F-5 Leichardt No 8
Price $0.00
Description The Grumman F6F Hellcat was a carrier-based fighter aircraft conceived to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat in United States Navy (USN) service. The Hellcat was an erstwhile rival of the faster Vought F4U Corsair for use as a carrier based fighter. However, the Corsair had significant issues with carrier landing that the Hellcat did not, allowing the Hellcat to steal a march as the Navy's dominant fighter in the second part of World War II, a position the Hellcat did not relinquish. The Corsair instead was primarily deployed to great effect in land-based use by the U.S. Marine Corps.

Although the F6F resembled the Wildcat in some ways, it was a completely new design, powered by a 2,000 hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800, the same powerplant used for both the Corsair and the United States Army Air Force's (USAAF) Republic P-47 Thunderbolt fighters. Some military observers tagged the Hellcat as the "Wildcat's big brother"

The F6F was best known for its role as a rugged, well-designed carrier fighter which was able, after its combat debut in early 1943, to counter the Mitsubishi A6M Zero and help secure air superiority over the Pacific Theater. Such was the quality of the basic simple, straightforward design, that the Hellcat was the least modified fighter of the war, with a total of 12,200 being built in just over two years.

Hellcats were credited with destroying 5,223 aircraft while in service with the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm This was more than any other Allied naval aircraft. Postwar, the Hellcat was phased out of frontline service, but remained in service as late as 1954 as a night fighter.

*** Information from Wikipedia

The F6F-5 Hellcat's speed, armour and impressive armament made it the U.S. Navy's favourite Pacific Theatre fighter plane. Manga artist Leiji Matsumoto's passion for World War II-era aircraft provided the basis for "The Cockpit," which featured the F6F-5 in "The Revenge that was buried in the Mountain." This kit features the F6F-5 Hellcat as it appeared in manga creator Leiji Matsumoto's "The Revenge that Was Buried in the Mountain," from "The Cockpit,".


Model is available in letter format with detail instruction diagram
Pictures
Item Name 1/100 Grumman F6F-5 Leichardt No 8
Price $0.00
Description The Grumman F6F Hellcat was a carrier-based fighter aircraft conceived to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat in United States Navy (USN) service. The Hellcat was an erstwhile rival of the faster Vought F4U Corsair for use as a carrier based fighter. However, the Corsair had significant issues with carrier landing that the Hellcat did not, allowing the Hellcat to steal a march as the Navy's dominant fighter in the second part of World War II, a position the Hellcat did not relinquish. The Corsair instead was primarily deployed to great effect in land-based use by the U.S. Marine Corps.

Although the F6F resembled the Wildcat in some ways, it was a completely new design, powered by a 2,000 hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800, the same powerplant used for both the Corsair and the United States Army Air Force's (USAAF) Republic P-47 Thunderbolt fighters. Some military observers tagged the Hellcat as the "Wildcat's big brother"

The F6F was best known for its role as a rugged, well-designed carrier fighter which was able, after its combat debut in early 1943, to counter the Mitsubishi A6M Zero and help secure air superiority over the Pacific Theater. Such was the quality of the basic simple, straightforward design, that the Hellcat was the least modified fighter of the war, with a total of 12,200 being built in just over two years.

Hellcats were credited with destroying 5,223 aircraft while in service with the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm This was more than any other Allied naval aircraft. Postwar, the Hellcat was phased out of frontline service, but remained in service as late as 1954 as a night fighter.

*** Information from Wikipedia

The F6F-5 Hellcat's speed, armour and impressive armament made it the U.S. Navy's favourite Pacific Theatre fighter plane. Manga artist Leiji Matsumoto's passion for World War II-era aircraft provided the basis for "The Cockpit," which featured the F6F-5 in "The Revenge that was buried in the Mountain." This kit features the F6F-5 Hellcat as it appeared in manga creator Leiji Matsumoto's "The Revenge that Was Buried in the Mountain," from "The Cockpit,".


Model is available in letter format with detail instruction diagram
Pictures

1/100 Hawker Hurricane Mk.II

Item Name 1/100 Hawker Hurricane Mk.II
Price $0.00
Description The Hawker Hurricane is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd for the Royal Air Force (RAF). Although largely overshadowed by the Supermarine Spitfire, the aircraft became renowned during the Battle of Britain, accounting for 60% of the RAF's air victories in the battle, and served in all the major theatres of the Second World War.

The 1930s design evolved through several versions and adaptations, resulting in a series of aircraft which acted as interceptor-fighters, fighter-bombers (also called "Hurribombers"), and ground support aircraft. Further versions known as the Sea Hurricane had modifications which enabled operation from ships. Some were converted as catapult-launched convoy escorts, known as "Hurricats". More than 14,583 Hurricanes were built by the end of 1944 (including at least 800 converted to Sea Hurricanes[3] and some 1,400 built in Canada by Canadian Car and Foundry).

*** Information from Wikipedia


Model is available in letter format with detail instruction diagram
Pictures
Item Name 1/100 Hawker Hurricane Mk.II
Price $0.00
Description The Hawker Hurricane is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd for the Royal Air Force (RAF). Although largely overshadowed by the Supermarine Spitfire, the aircraft became renowned during the Battle of Britain, accounting for 60% of the RAF's air victories in the battle, and served in all the major theatres of the Second World War.

The 1930s design evolved through several versions and adaptations, resulting in a series of aircraft which acted as interceptor-fighters, fighter-bombers (also called "Hurribombers"), and ground support aircraft. Further versions known as the Sea Hurricane had modifications which enabled operation from ships. Some were converted as catapult-launched convoy escorts, known as "Hurricats". More than 14,583 Hurricanes were built by the end of 1944 (including at least 800 converted to Sea Hurricanes[3] and some 1,400 built in Canada by Canadian Car and Foundry).

*** Information from Wikipedia


Model is available in letter format with detail instruction diagram
Pictures

1/48 North American P-51K 12th FBS USAF

Item Name 1/48 North American P-51K 12th FBS USAF
Price $0.00
Description The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II, the Korean War and other conflicts. The Mustang was conceived, designed and built by North American Aviation (NAA) in response to aspecification issued directly to NAA by the British Purchasing Commission. The prototype NA-73X airframe was rolled out on 9 September 1940, 102 days after the contract was signed and, with an engine installed, first flew on 26 October. The Mustang was originally designed to use the Allison V-1710 engine, which had limited high-altitude performance. It was first flown operationally by the Royal Air Force (RAF) as a tactical-reconnaissance aircraft and fighter-bomber (Mustang Mk I). The addition of theRolls-Royce Merlin to the P-51B/C model transformed the Mustang's performance at altitudes above 15,000 ft, matching or bettering that of the Luftwaffe's fighters. The definitive version, the P-51D, was powered by the Packard V-1650-7, a license-built version of the Rolls-Royce Merlin 60 series two-stage two-speed supercharged engine, and armed with six .50 caliber (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns

From late 1943, P-51Bs (supplemented by P-51Ds from mid-1944) were used by the USAAF's Eighth Air Force to escort bombers in raids over Germany, while the RAF's 2 TAF and the USAAF's Ninth Air Force used the Merlin-powered Mustangs as fighter-bombers, roles in which the Mustang helped ensure Allied air superiority in 1944. The P-51 was also in service with Allied air forces in the North African, Mediterranean and Italian theaters, and saw limited service against the Japanese in the Pacific War. During World War II, Mustang pilots claimed 4,950 enemy aircraft shot down.

At the start of the Korean War, the Mustang was the main fighter of the United Nations until jet fighters such as the F-86 took over this role; the Mustang then became a specialized fighter-bomber. Despite the advent of jet fighters, the Mustang remained in service with some air forces until the early 1980s. After World War II and the Korean War, many Mustangs were converted for civilian use, especially air racing, and increasingly, preserved and flown as historic warbird aircraft at airshows.

Model is available in letter format with detail instruction diagram
Pictures
Item Name 1/48 North American P-51K 12th FBS USAF
Price $0.00
Description The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II, the Korean War and other conflicts. The Mustang was conceived, designed and built by North American Aviation (NAA) in response to aspecification issued directly to NAA by the British Purchasing Commission. The prototype NA-73X airframe was rolled out on 9 September 1940, 102 days after the contract was signed and, with an engine installed, first flew on 26 October. The Mustang was originally designed to use the Allison V-1710 engine, which had limited high-altitude performance. It was first flown operationally by the Royal Air Force (RAF) as a tactical-reconnaissance aircraft and fighter-bomber (Mustang Mk I). The addition of theRolls-Royce Merlin to the P-51B/C model transformed the Mustang's performance at altitudes above 15,000 ft, matching or bettering that of the Luftwaffe's fighters. The definitive version, the P-51D, was powered by the Packard V-1650-7, a license-built version of the Rolls-Royce Merlin 60 series two-stage two-speed supercharged engine, and armed with six .50 caliber (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns

From late 1943, P-51Bs (supplemented by P-51Ds from mid-1944) were used by the USAAF's Eighth Air Force to escort bombers in raids over Germany, while the RAF's 2 TAF and the USAAF's Ninth Air Force used the Merlin-powered Mustangs as fighter-bombers, roles in which the Mustang helped ensure Allied air superiority in 1944. The P-51 was also in service with Allied air forces in the North African, Mediterranean and Italian theaters, and saw limited service against the Japanese in the Pacific War. During World War II, Mustang pilots claimed 4,950 enemy aircraft shot down.

At the start of the Korean War, the Mustang was the main fighter of the United Nations until jet fighters such as the F-86 took over this role; the Mustang then became a specialized fighter-bomber. Despite the advent of jet fighters, the Mustang remained in service with some air forces until the early 1980s. After World War II and the Korean War, many Mustangs were converted for civilian use, especially air racing, and increasingly, preserved and flown as historic warbird aircraft at airshows.

Model is available in letter format with detail instruction diagram
Pictures

1/48 North American F-86F Sabre

Item Name 1/48 North American F-86F Sabre
Price $3.99
Description The North American F-86 Sabre, sometimes called the Sabrejet, was a transonic jet fighter aircraft. Produced by North American Aviation, the Sabre is best known as the United States' first swept wing fighter which could counter the similarly-winged Soviet MiG-15 in high-speed dogfights over the skies of the Korean War (1950-53). Considered one of the best and most important fighter aircraft in that war, the F-86 is also rated highly in comparison with fighters of other eras. Although it was developed in the late 1940s and was outdated by the end of the '50s, the Sabre proved versatile and adaptable, and continued as a front-line fighter in numerous air forces until the last active operational examples were retired by the Bolivian Air Force in 1994.


Its success led to an extended production run of more than 7,800 aircraft between 1949 and 1956, in the U.S., Japan and Italy. Variants were built in Canada and Australia. The Canadair Sabre added another 1,815 airframes, and the significantly redesigned CAC Sabre (sometimes known as the Avon Sabre or CAC CA-27), had a production run of 112. The Sabre was by far the most-produced Western jet fighter, with total production of all variants at 9,860 units.
Pictures
Item Name 1/48 North American F-86F Sabre
Price $3.99
Description The North American F-86 Sabre, sometimes called the Sabrejet, was a transonic jet fighter aircraft. Produced by North American Aviation, the Sabre is best known as the United States' first swept wing fighter which could counter the similarly-winged Soviet MiG-15 in high-speed dogfights over the skies of the Korean War (1950-53). Considered one of the best and most important fighter aircraft in that war, the F-86 is also rated highly in comparison with fighters of other eras. Although it was developed in the late 1940s and was outdated by the end of the '50s, the Sabre proved versatile and adaptable, and continued as a front-line fighter in numerous air forces until the last active operational examples were retired by the Bolivian Air Force in 1994.


Its success led to an extended production run of more than 7,800 aircraft between 1949 and 1956, in the U.S., Japan and Italy. Variants were built in Canada and Australia. The Canadair Sabre added another 1,815 airframes, and the significantly redesigned CAC Sabre (sometimes known as the Avon Sabre or CAC CA-27), had a production run of 112. The Sabre was by far the most-produced Western jet fighter, with total production of all variants at 9,860 units.
Pictures
 
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